Monday, June 13, 2016

The Dilemma of The Ticket and the P1 in Times of Tragedy



A brief and I-hope-not-disrespectful Ticket observation on this sad morning:

With full understanding of how trivial our concerns are here at MTC when something like the Orlando murders dominate the news: 

I think The Ticket shows face a difficult choice in these situations.  I wonder if it's rough on the P1 as well.  Speaking only for myself, it is.

You're a Ticket host, and something like this happens.

On the one hand, you're broadcasting for a sports/guy station, known for a humorous approach. It's what your listeners tune in for.

On the other, if you ignore the event, you would give the impression of being frivolous, disconnected, uncaring.

I feel the same dilemma as a listener.

I would think it odd if The Ticket programs didn't devote segments to something this spectacular in the non-sports news.

But I don't particularly want to listen to those segments.  Confessors have observed, and I agree with them, that Current Events Talk brings the shows to a stop, although some (Musers) handle it better than others (Hardline).  I don't expect Ticket hosts to be particularly well-informed or astute on non-sportsy/guyish things, and they're not.  Not only that, but there are many superior radio sources for breaking news and punditry up and down the dial and now on satellite.

My resolution of the dilemma:  I tune out.  I'm off to CNN, Fox News Channel, Little Steven's Underground Garage or Bluesville on Sirius/XM, or maybe NPR, until I judge the Ticket segment to be concluded, then it's back to Fun With the Ticket.   Sorry.

41 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good post Pman. I agree it is a tough call for the Ticket shows. I will listen to the Musers because they look at things and discuss things in a very even handed manner, looking at both sides of the issue. I thought the discussions this morning were really good. BaD radio will touch on it in the 1:30 news, but usually they are just business as usual which I appreciate. On days like today I will not listen to the Hardline. I have better things to do with my time than to be preached to by Corby and Danny.

Anonymous said...

Totally gugree with @Anon_10:55. I was just thinking about that after the Musers ended this morning. While I disagree with Craig's ideas about what to do, at least he discussed it and sounded as if he'd put some thought into it rather than scanning a news article during the discussion to get information and then preaching at all the idiots that disagree.

deezy said...

I have to agree with 1055 and 1100 here - I slept in this morning (up late with a sick child) so I completely missed my Musers, but missing THL this afternoon will be intentional.

Anonymous said...

I think a lot of P-1s believe the Ticket was never better than in the days following 9-11. Of course, sporting events were suspended so there wasn't much else to talk about. These guys all have the gift of gab and know how to kill segments in an entertaining and informative way. But the preachiness we will probably get this afternoon is exhausting.

DRW1961 said...

As long as the discussions are respectful and well-informed, I really don’t have any problem with it. Some of the best non-sports broadcasting that the Ticket has done is the post 9/11 shows.

I’m 99% certain I won’t listen to the Hardline this afternoon on the way home. My listening of their show has tailed off quite a bit over the past few weeks (in favor of listening to podcasts), but I will catch the show every once in a while. I’ll pretty much actively avoid the shows this week though. It’s just going to be hard stomaching the hyperbolic, misinformed and “holier-than-thou” stuff that will come from the airwaves for the next few days when they talk about this event.

What I heard from the Musers this morning was ok. They started to go semi-political when they were talking about the Dan Patrick tweet. Overall, it was pretty good though.

Anonymous said...

On the other hand, we need to hear Mike's story about his absence Friday. If there is one.

blergoyen said...

It's not good radio. But there are so many other choices it doesn't really matter for a couple of days. I doubt the on-air personalities care if you like it or not either.

Boo! said...

I'm going to be the dissenting voice here

I want to hear what everyone on TLT has to say because I think it's important in situations like these to listen to what others think. The Hartline summarized it best for me, it's a terrible situation but we can't even have a conversation about it because somehow it's become too political.

East Texas P1 said...

Boo and all other Confessors -

I can't believe that Mike made a sexual joke while Corby was describing the Pepper Hamilton report. Maybe he just had a bone-head moment but as best I can remember.

Corby: The Pepper Hamilton report was oral, nothing at all was written.

Mike: All oral? Sounds like a date with me.

Corby: Really, that is just gross.

So Mike's next contribution was a few minutes later and was on-point. However, a little problem there Rhyner (he's dead).

Boo! said...

@ETXp1 I cringed when I heard that too, Mike seemed a little loopy today

Anonymous said...

Corby:

"I don't love anything as much as some people love their guns."

Corby:

"I'm not preaching."

Anonymous said...

Yeah but was he wrong?

The Plainsman said...

Corby really said, "I'm not preaching"?

He must be reading his emails or other press clippings.

Ed said...

For his kids sake, I hope he loves them as much as people love their guns. So, yes, I would say he probably misspoke

deezy said...

Ed, I thought the same thing at first blush, but he did say anyTHING, not anyONE. Let's give him the benefit of the doubt here (I say that as a guy who doesn't like to give Corby the benefit of the doubt much.)

Now, if Mr. Hyperbole really does think that people love "their guns" more than most human beings love their own offspring, then benefit of doubt retracted.

Boo! said...

@Pman

I do think its funny how similar verbiage from the fan-sites pop up on the ticket. Like a few weeks ago you used the word "Puss" in reference to someone's face, and I swear it wasn't 2 days later that Gordon used it in an 8:40 bit, Coincidence probably.

As for Corby, just a little hyperbole/playing radio, nothing to see there. But I do agree with Corby in a general sense, SOME gun people rrrreeeeaaaaallllly love their guns.

The Plainsman said...

Yeah, I hear those things, too. I brought the "thrashing" locution with me to MTC from my Chicago days (e.g., "listening to Hillary Clinton's fake accents is a complete thrashing" -- in other words, where the traditional Ticket lexicographer would have used "beating"). I used it here a fair amount, and then began to hear it (rarely) on The Ticket. Agreed, probably coincidence (especially since I recall George using it, and I don't think he has MTC-awareness), but I was startled to hear it nonetheless.

Anonymous said...

Seeing how Jub is originally from the Chicagoland area, a d how his whole side of the family is from there, and that nany if not most still live there....why were uou startled to hear him use Chicago-speak?

Shaggy said...

Hot Fries Georgie would have you know he is originally from Texas, sir...

Anonymous said...

I guess the biggest problem I have with people like Corby and Danny and Bob railing against guns is the fact that they are fortunate enough to live in very secure neighborhoods, protected ironically enough by good guys with guns. They have never felt the need to own a gun and really know very little about them aside from what they hear on TV. My guess is that if they lived in sunny south Dallas or any of the other rough parts of DFW they may think differently. If they lived in a rural area where it may take police 20 minutes to respond they may think differently. If, God forbid, anyone was ever in their house with the intent of harming their wife or child I'm guessing they would want to have a gun in hand. Criminals by definition break laws. Weed is illegal, but I know that any Ticket host could find and buy weed by noon today. You can pass all the laws you want, and those who intend to harm others will find a way around them to carry out their goal.

Shaggy said...

I must have missed where Corby, Danny, and Bob said that people shouldn't be allowed to own any guns.

Boo! said...

@644

I don't think they said that no one should be allowed to own guns, but they were mentioning that there are some inconsistencies in who can buy a gun, for instance, why can someone on the no-fly list buy a gun?

I agree with most of what you said in your post, but the conversation gets hijacked by those that want to give everyone a gun and those that want to take all guns away, and we never get to the point where we can have an honest discussion about what we can do to attempt to fix some of the holes within gun regulation that allow people with bad intentions to slip through.

blergoyen said...

Aside from the 2nd amendment debate, hearing corky and Musical Lurch whip up a solid FBI profile on the shooter based on tweeter and 2-3 of their go-to news outlets is beyond laughable.

Anonymous said...

Has there been a previous discussion about why Summer Bash was moved from Sneaky Pete's? Strictly a financial decision? Did I-35 construction make Sneaky Pete's problematic?

Platinum said...

Or did Sneaky Pete's decide to go with The FAN? Remember, that was an issue last year (or was it the year before?).

Anonymous said...

I had to chuckle at Corby's response when Mike was telling how they will have to call music experts to testify at the Led Zepplin/Spirit trial.

"Beating"

Anonymous said...

First, I don't own a gun. College roommate did. I went to the range with him a few times. Sometimes, I listened to conversations between big time gun owners. They get into such detail and minutia and speak with such passion that I reached a conclusion. These guys are just nerds. If it was computers they were talking about, we'd call them nerds. If it was comics, we'd call them nerds. If it is wine or music or food, we call them something else. People have passions.

As for the legality of it, I note there are plenty of high and mighty liberals with there own absolutist rants: "I'd rather 10 guilty people go free than see an innocent man be convicted," is one. Various comments about free speech are more examples, but some seem less interested in that these days.

Again, I know the gun nut. I don't worry about the gun nut. I worry about the nuts with guns. There is very little, if any, overlap.

Now let's talk about propel that love things as much as some people love their guns. Absolutely, those people exist. I know animal lovers that border on psychosis. I met an arborist who's love of trees creeped me out. There are car guys that have some kind of dimentia.

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately, Danny didn't explain why it's Trump's fault if protesters disturb his friends who live around Gilleys.

Anonymous said...

Perusing some old traffic I was reminded that in 2014 another sports radio station in the area announced an event at Sneaky Pete's and then moved it three days before the event because Sneaky Pete's wasn't big enough.

Rhinosaur said...

Sneaky Pete's has had some problems lately. Large dip in quality. Last year was under water. I think ownership/management changes have played a part in it. I know some groups who went out there in the past to host events...it's not even on their radar anymore.

Anonymous said...

Poor Mike. He had to sit there and watch Colby lose a perfect game, then a no-hitter, and then a shut out in the course of an inning.

Ed said...

I like how Corby ripped his own kid for not having the attention span to stay with a game that is not close… one day after admitting that he turned off the Rangers game when it was 5-0

His utter lack of self-awareness can be jaw-dropping at times

Shaggy said...

Was that because he got distracted or because he went to bed?

Lucky Jim said...

By 1889, the New York Times was reporting a "War on Telephone Poles." Wherever telephone companies were erecting poles, home owners and business owners were sawing them down or defending their sidewalks with rifles.

Property owners in Red Bank, New Jersey, threatened to tar and feather the workers putting up telephone poles. A judge granted a group of home owners an injunction to prevent the telephone company from erecting any new poles. Another judge found that a man who had cut down a pole because it was "obnoxious" was not guilty of malicious mischief.

Telephone poles, newspaper editorials complained, were an urban blight. The poles carried a wire for each telephone—sometimes hundreds of wires. And in some places there were also telegraph wires, power lines, and trolley cables. The sky was netted with wires.

The war on telephone poles was fueled, in part, by that terribly American concern for private property, and a reluctance to surrender it for a shared utility. And then there was a fierce sense of aesthetics, an obsession with purity, a dislike for the way the poles and wires marred a landscape that those other new inventions, skyscrapers and barbed wire, were just beginning to complicate. And then perhaps there was also a fear that distance, as it had always been known and measured, was collapsing.

The city council in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, ordered policemen to cut down all the telephone poles in town. And the mayor of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, ordered the police chief and the fire department to chop down the telephone poles there. Only one pole was chopped down before the telephone men climbed all the poles along the line, preventing any more chopping. Soon, Bell Telephone Company began stationing a man at the top of each pole as soon as it had been set, until enough poles had been set to string a wire between them, at which point it became a misdemeanor to interfere with the poles. Even so, a constable cut down two poles holding forty or fifty wires. And a home owner sawed down a recently wired pole, then fled from police. The owner of a cannery ordered his workers to throw dirt back into the hole the telephone company was digging in front of his building. His men threw the dirt back in as fast as the telephone workers could dig it out. Then he sent out a team with a load of stones to dump into the hole. Eventually, the pole was erected on the other side of the street.

- from "Time and Distance Overcome" by Eula Biss

MoronDog said...

A guy named John Liddle tweeted today he's joining The Ticket as a ticket guy. Any Intel on what shift?

MoronDog said...

Ticker guy

Anonymous said...

Thought this was appropriate for today. (Press the play tab next to the title.)

https://myspace.com/birddogmusic/music/song/thought-it-was-you-61668651-67347235

Anonymous said...

Get off the dope, Lucky Jim.

Anonymous said...

It was a botched robbery.

Shaggy said...

Were there henchmen as well?

Gopher said...

Summer Bash pics.

http://www.dallasobserver.com/slideshow/the-tickets-2016-summerbash-8407432