Friday, January 29, 2010

Ever Wondered What "Heave To and Trice Up" Means?

Mike Rhyner has taken to using this phrase in his introduction to the Hardline program.

The phrase apparently has a couple of meanings from military naval usages.   It is more frequently expressed as "heave out and trice up."

In former days, it reportedly was a call to the crew to get out of bed (hammocks, whatever) and assemble on the deck to view floggings administered as discipline to crew members. All sailors were required to be present to view the punishment.

More recently, it is a call to the crew to get out of their bunks and fold the bunks up to the wall and secure them there.

If I get any other (better) explanations, I'll post.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Heave to", also "hove to" is a nautical term in which one backwinds their foresail and turns the tiller to oppose it. The boat can't sail in this config and gently drifts with the wind. It's generally used to weather a storm or as a pause in sailing, for maintenance or feeding the crew.

The Plainsman said...

You speak with the voice of authority, Anonymous. However, I'm thinking that my definition (of course, I got it from Googling the phrase -- I have no expertise in oceangoing terminology) sounds more like what Mike R is conveying when he urges the P1 Nation to "heave to and trice up." Thanks, your erudition is most welcome.

Bill said...

The captain of our small Navy ship flipped out when he heard a the novice watch announce his own version as "Heave up and trice to". We all received a lecture on just where that phrase came from!

Anonymous said...

What about "bill about smartly" and what is the entire phrase its been awhile since I have heard them play the whole thing at the beginning of the hardline...

derwyn bulger said...

I thought it was mill about smartly

derwyn bulger said...

I thought it was mill about smartly